Friday, June 24, 2011

8109 Flatbed Truck - New Images


While I've seen these at Setechnic yesterday, my laptop has been fully overloaded producing videos and uploading them into YouTube...

However I couldn't let this go, without notice.
We have finally additional images from upcoming set 8109 Flatbed Truck, which reveal new details.


It was already know from the previous images, this set will include one PF M-motor to command the flatbed.
Now it becomes even more clear how the flatbed works. It can tilt while sliding out.
This kind of tow truck also has a retractile fork, where you can carry another vehicle pulling it from the front axle. It makes perfect sense one can push/pull the fork from the underside, using the same motor. The gearing on the fork also suggests there is a combined movement that controls the tilt to the rings, where the wheels from the towed vehicle embed. There is also a rubber belt visible inside the fork, although it is still unclear its exact function.

As these new images are taken from the model opposite side, relative to the previous ones, we can now clearly see that both movements (flatbed and tow fork) should be switched from the lever under the red side door.
Also it became evident that the winch is manually operated only, from the knob on the right side.

10 comments:

21st century Cars said...

This looks like a really nice set! I have an option right now should i buy the 8258 or 8109?, please suggest.
Thank you

Conchas said...

@21st century Cars

These are completely different sets, int terms of functionality, number of parts and price...

Between the two, obviously I'd choose 8258.

Later you can buy 8109, as it will last longer in the market.

21st century Cars said...

@Conchas
i agree thanks

Wiseman_2 said...

The function of the rubber band is clear if you look on the Amazon page which lets you zoom in. The gears on the lift are not connected to the motor. The 20T bevel gear has a pair of 2L liftarms on the same axle, with one of those knob-pins which the band connects to. This simple technique means the forks stay in an upright position unless there is weight on them.

I will probably pick this one up at some point, it's pretty good value considering it has 1115 parts and a motor.

Keef2 said...

I really liked the look of this, but like the 8275 it seems a shame that there does not look to be any kind of rotational function on the spec-lift. This obviously makes it not perform very well when turning corners. I'm surprised TLG did not use a similar design to the 8462.

Tristan said...

Love the styling. However I highly suspect the price will be quite high and the lack of mechanisms are a concern.

Junkstyle Gio said...

Got a big picture of the b-model here:
http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/JunkstyleGio/Misc/b3_stitch.jpg

Ryan said...

The gears of the rack are not just limited to the part we see. There must be a connection of the gears with the inside of the model. Otherwise the reduction of the gears doesn't make sense...

Wiseman_2 said...

No, the reduction is there merely because, with a 12T double bevel gear in place of the 20T bevel gear, there would be no room for the 2L liftarms.

I don't see how the wheel lift could connect to the gear train due to the telescoping mechanism used. Plus, if you look at the switch, you can see the sticker indicating that the motor controls bed lift and wheel lift extension.

walters.stephen1 said...

Nice! Quite a large set witha good variety of pieces. And I still can't believe that it only has eight fewer pieces than 8043!

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